Monday, May 07, 2007

Lucy's story

Just a quick post to announce a new blogger on the scene, http://paperporcupine.blogspot.com/. I know, we thought it would never happen, but Wyo. Sister is now on board. Little Bro. and Hillbilly sister, you are the last holdouts.
Speaking of Hillbilly sister, when is your young' en going to make a granny out of you. I've been waiting for the anouncement every day. You will let me know, won't you. And send photos .... better yet, let me come and take some photos and scrap the little guy. (guy? right?!!)
I had an interesting experience today. The youth of our ward (starting at age 14, so DS-12 misses is, darn it!) are preparing to go to Wyoming for the Handcart Trek this summer. A few weeks ago we were asked to submit names of ancestors in the Willie and Martin Handcart companies. Apparently to personalize the trek, youth are asked to take on the name of members of the handcart company.
Yesterday the first counselor of the Relief Society told me her daugher had been given the name of Lucy Ward, my grandmother's grandmother. My children and I were invited to go to her house tonight and tell her daughter about Lucy. (DH was working, or I'm sure he would have gone with us).
For those of you unfamiliar with the story ... here's the report on the Willie Handcart Company site:


Lucy Ward
Willie Handcart Company
To each hundred there were five tents with 20 persons to a tent; 20
handcarts and one Chicago Wagon drawn by three yoke of oxen to hold provisions and tents, each person was limited to seventeen pounds of clothing and bedding.
The strength of the company was equalized as much as possible by
distributing the young men among the different families to help them. Several carts were drawn by young girls exclusively. Lucy was one of these. She had just turned 23 years old in May.
At this time, (6 Oct. 1856) the Salt Lake Conference was taking place and Brigham Young was sending a rescue party to the stranded handcart companies.
James Barnett Cole, went with them. One night he dreamed he would meet his future wife with the stranded Saints. He even was shown what she looked like.
She had a fur cap and a green veil tied over her cap to keep the wind off, she was very beautiful.
He told his dream to Brother [William} Kimball and he remarked, "We will see no beautiful girl with a fur cap and a green veil in these frozen
Saints."
Reminiscing, James Barnett Cole said that they saw the encampment just as the sun was sinking in the west. It looked like an Eskimo village which was fully a mile away. The snow was very deep and paths had been made from tent to tent giving the camp that appearance. It was located on a plain near the river.
When the people caught sight of the train coming, they shouted, they cried, they threw off all restraint and freely embraced their deliverers.
Just then, William Kimball caught sight of Lucy Ward in the green veil. He drove up to her and said, "Brother Jim, there is your dream girl." James asked her to get in the wagon and her reply was, "No I don't know you."
She got used to the idea of having him around, because on the way to Salt Lake, on November 2, 1856, they were married at Fort Bridger by William Kimball.
- Story or Lucy Ward by Ruby M. F. Hall,
Granddaughter

6 comments:

wyo sis said...

I love that story. I always cry when I read it or tell it. What a lucky girl to have her name. I always think of it as the only story without deep sorrow attached to it, and yet she surely felt sorrow and despair. It's the idea that love blooms even in Martin's Cove. I have only seen pictures of her as an old lady, but she was so cute I'm sure she must have been beautiful when she was 23. I also like the story about James's mother being a little impatient with her, because she had been gently brought up in a middle class family in England. Of course Jim and his family had been driven from place to place with the early saints, and had known only hardship and pioneering. When she would complain about Jim doing what she called women's work around the house he would say "It's a damn poor family that can't afford one lady." I also read that he died while she was away helping someone have a baby. She was needed there, and couldn't get home so she sent word to bury him and where, and didn't even get home for the funeral. They were tough people. Even the "ladies." I can't even imagine what they went through.

Hillbilly sister said...

I too love this story. I did not know about the other stories Wyo sis mentioned here. I believe this is why our family is so "durn" tough, because it is in our genes. As for the grand baby, he has not made his appearance yet. My belief is because both DD and her DH are stubborn and this boy will come when he is darn good and ready. If this grandun doesn't get the stubbornness out of his parents nothing will. P.S. please accept my apologies for the last time I wrote the blog. I had been feeling rather cranky about family at the time. To answer wyo sis's question; it was our DM who didn't want me to come up any more for Thanksgiving. I do not know how to "blog"

Anonymous said...

Lucy Ward is my 3rd great grandmother. I always love hearing her story and how she survived. In my opinion, it is one of the greatest love stories ever told. =]

Anonymous said...

Our stake is going to Wyoming this summer 2010 and my daughter is representing Lucy Ward (Cole).Our family is related because we are descendants of Barnet Cole and Phoebe Van Alstyne. Lucy was my relative's sister in law. I love her story!
Debby from CA

Anonymous said...

Our stake is going to Wyoming this summer 2010 and my daughter is representing Lucy Ward (Cole).Our family is related because we are descendants of Barnet Cole and Phoebe Van Alstyne. Lucy was my relative's sister in law. I love her story!
Debby from CA

Anonymous said...

Our stake is going to Wyoming this summer 2010 and my daughter is representing Lucy Ward (Cole).Our family is related because we are descendants of Barnet Cole and Phoebe Van Alstyne. Lucy was my relative's sister in law. I love her story!
Debby from CA